boy_playing200CHA P T E R 4

Pedagogy and Play: Creating a Playful Curriculum for

Academic Achievement and Engaged Learning

Brock R. Dubbels, PhD.,  Dept. Psychology, Neuroscience, & Behavior, McMaster University, Hamilton,

ON, Canada, Dubbels@McMaster.ca

Key Summary Points

Using instructional techniques based upon play can improve achievement. Standardization has created more problems than it solved. Three case studies are presented as demonstrations of the framework.  When children engage in complex peer play, they exhibit greater gains in levels of symbolic functional and oral language production.

Key Terms

Play, Assessment, Learner Centered Practices, Instructional Communication, Curriculum, Cognitive, Affect, Classroom, Instructional Design, Learning

The Benefits of Play

Play is not only an imaginative activity of amusement. Play and games serve important roles in cognitive, social, and affective development (Dubbels, 2014; Fisher, 1992; Frost, 1998; Garvey, 1990). In pre-industrial times, pastoral and foraging societies, children did not learn sequestered away from adult contexts (Thomas, 1964). Instead, children participated in playful variations of adult activities, where they could observe adults at work, and were able to imitate and emulate these activities through play without the danger of failure and consequence (Bock, 2005; Rogoff, 1994). Rubin, Fein, and Vandenberg provided a thorough psychological overview of the early role of play in their chapter in volume four of the Manual of Child Psychology (1983). They observed that humans play longer relative to other mammals that play. Lancaster and Lancaster (1987) built upon this position and state that this extended period of play is essential for development. Bjorklund, (2006) expands upon this view, and states that humans play longer because they are adaptive organisms, and, that extended play is essential, allowing humans the skills and knowledge to become independent in complex environments. When children engage in complex peer play, they exhibit greater gains in levels of symbolic functional and oral language production, as compared to if they are interacting with an adult (Pellegrini, 1983). Additionally, when a learner experiences learning through play, where they can experience and roleplay adult work, they report the activities are more meaningful, and that the activity did not feel like learning (Dubbels, 2010). This aligns with Winkielman & Cacioppo, (2001), who found that when learning new information is experienced as easy, processing is experienced as pleasant and effective.

Read more of this article, download, feel good

Pages from Learning-Education-Games-2_Schreier-Shaenfield-etal-web 2

This is the second book in the series, which was written, edited, and reviewed by members of the Learning, Education & Games Special Interest Group (LEG SIG), a subset of the International Game Developers Association (IGDA).

This volume explores issues designing and using games in formal learning environments, classrooms, and school-based programs. This includes chapters on (1) using games in the classroom, (2) how to choose appropriate games for the classroom, (3) using gamification (or game related techniques in non-game settings) in the classroom, (4) creating a playful curriculum, and (5) using games to support ADHD and autism spectrum students.

It delves into the needs of community constituents and informal learning spaces, such as libraries, homeschools, and parents and policy-makers, who are also intricately involved in guiding and implementing educational practices and initiatives.

Finally, we investigate the platform, technological, and other logistical considerations associated with designing and using games in educational settings. We discuss the merits and drawbacks of using LARPs (live action role-playing) as a tool for learning, and we also detail the latest software, engines, tools, platforms, and programs for making games. This is particularly useful for educators who are considering the pros and cons of various development tools to teach their students, or for educational game developers thinking about options for creating their next game.

Link to download book


transmedia-storytelling11

I am pleased to provide you with the official announcement for the latest issue of the International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations 8(2). Please post it to the appropriate listservs, websites, media outlets, etc. to further increase the awareness of the latest issue of IJGCMS. This is a special issue on Transmedia Story Telling, lead by our Special Issue Guest Editor, Dr. Karen Schrier

 

http://www.igi-global.com/journals/abstract-announcement/131817

Enjoy!

esports

CFP: eSports and professional game play

The purpose of this special issue is to investigate the rise of eSports.

Much has happened in the area of professional gaming since the Space Invaders Championship of 1980. We have seen live Internet streaming eclipse televised eSports events, such as on the American show Starcade.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that

  • Examine the emergence of eSports
  • The uses of streaming technology
  • Traditions of games that support professional players – chess, go, bridge, poker, league of legends, Dota 2, Starcraft
  • Fan perspectives
  • Professional player perspectives
  • Market analysis
  • Meta-analyses of existing research on eSports
  • Answer specific questions such as:
    • How should game user research examine the emergence of eSports? Should we differentiate pragmatic and hedonic aspects of the game?
    • What are the methodologies for conducting research on eSports?
    • What is the role of player, the audience, the developer, the venue?
  • Case studies, worked examples, empirical and phenomenological, application of psychological and humanist approaches?
  • Field research
  • Face to face interviewing
  • Creation of user tests
  • Gathering and organizing statistics
  • Define Audience
  • User scenarios
  • Creating Personas
  • Product design
  • Feature writing
  • Requirement writing
  • Content surveys
  • Graphic Arts
  • Interaction design
  • Information architecture
  • Process flows
  • Usability
  • Prototype development
  • Interface layout and design
  • Wire frames
  • Visual design
  • Taxonomy and terminology creation
  • Copywriting
  • Working with programmers and SMEs
  • Brainstorm and managing scope (requirement) creep
  • Design and UX culture

Potential authors are encouraged to contact Brock R. Dubbels (Dubbels@mcmaster.ca) to ask about the appropriateness of their topic.

Deadline for Submission July 2016.

Authors should submit their manuscripts to the submission system using the following link:

http://www.igi-global.com/authorseditors/titlesubmission/newproject.aspx

(Please note authors will need to create a member profile in order to upload a manuscript.)

Manuscripts should be submitted in APA format.

They will typically be 5000-8000 words in length.

Full submission guidelines can be found at: http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx

Mission – IJGCMS is a peer-reviewed, international journal devoted to the theoretical and empirical understanding of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations. IJGCMS publishes research articles, theoretical critiques, and book reviews related to the development and evaluation of games and computer-mediated simulations. One main goal of this peer-reviewed, international journal is to promote a deep conceptual and empirical understanding of the roles of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations across multiple disciplines. A second goal is to help build a significant bridge between research and practice on electronic gaming and simulations, supporting the work of researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.

 

 

justright (1)
Abstract Announcement for International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations (IJGCMS) 7(1)

The contents of the latest issue of:
International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations (IJGCMS)
Volume 7, Issue 1, January – March 2015
Published: Quarterly in Print and Electronically
ISSN: 1942-3888; EISSN: 1942-3896;
Published by IGI Global Publishing, Hershey, USA
www.igi-global.com/ijgcms

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Brock Dubbels (McMaster University, Canada)

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to the International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations (IJGCMS). All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.

EDITORIAL PREFACE

Brock R. Dubbels PhD., McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

To obtain a copy of the Editorial Preface, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/pdf.aspx?tid=125440&ptid=118613&ctid=15&t=And This One Was Just Right: In Search of Goldilocks in Player Experience

ARTICLE 1

Flow Genres: The Varieties of Video Game Experience

Ondrej Hrabec (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic), Vladimír Chrz (Institute of Psychology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic)

The goal of this theoretical study is to conceptually revise the flow theory formulated originally by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. Concept of flow is one of the most frequently used terms that describe an optimal experience while performing activity and this does not apply only for video game industry. In this article we discuss the varieties of flow experience with respect to video games. Further, the authors emphasize relativity of the original concept of flow, understood as a universal experience of independent nature in terms of activity or personality of the participant. Following detailed analysis of existing literature and our previous empirical study, they define the concept of flow as a genre triad that portrays experience of climax, ilinx, and ludic trance. A further revision and extension of the original concept of flow is deemed necessary in order to map the variety of user experiences while playing video games with sufficient precision.

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/article/flow-genres/125443

To read a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=125443

ARTICLE 2

Investigating Real-time Predictors of Engagement: Implications for Adaptive Videogames and Online Training

David Sharek (North Carolina State Univeristy, Raleigh, NC, USA), Eric Wiebe (North Carolina State Univeristy, Raleigh, NC, USA)

Engagement is a worthwhile psychological construct to examine in the context of video games and online training. In this context, previous research suggests that the more engaged a person is, the more likely they are to experience overall positive affect while performing at a high level. This research builds on theories of engagement, Flow Theory, and Cognitive Load Theory, to operationalize engagement in terms of cognitive load, affect, and performance. An adaptive algorithm was then developed to test the proposed operationalization of engagement. Using a puzzle-based video game, player performance and engagement was compared across three conditions: adaptive gameplay, a traditional linear gameplay, and choice-based gameplay. Results show that those in the adaptive gameplay condition performed higher compared to those in the other two conditions without any degradation of overall affect or self-report of engagement.

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/article/investigating-real-time-predictors-of-engagement/125444

To read a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=125444

ARTICLE 3

Design and Development of a Simulation for Testing the Effects of Instructional Gaming Characteristics on Learning of Basic Statistical Skills

Elena Novak (School of Teacher Education, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA), Tristan E. Johnson (Graduate School of Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA)

Considerable resources have been invested in examining the game design principles that best foster learning. One way to understand what constitutes a well-designed instructional game is to examine the relationship between gaming characteristics and actual learning. This report discusses the lessons learned from the design and development process of instructional simulations that are enhanced by competition and storyline gaming characteristics and developed as instructional interventions for a study on the effects of gaming characteristics on learning effectiveness and engagement. The goal of the instructional simulations was to engage college students in learning the statistics concepts of standard deviation and the empirical rule. A pilot study followed by a small-scale experimental study were conducted to improve the value and effectiveness of these designed simulations. Based on these findings, specific practical implications are offered for designing actual learning environments that are enhanced by competition and storyline gaming elements.

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/article/design-and-development-of-a-simulation-for-testing-the-effects-of-instructional-gaming-characteristics-on-learning-of-basic-statistical-skills/125445

To read a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=125445

ARTICLE 4

Personality Impressions of World of Warcraft Players Based on Their Avatars and Usernames: Consensus but No Accuracy

Gabriella M. Harari (The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA), Lindsay T. Graham (The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA), Samuel D. Gosling (The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA & School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia)

Every week an estimated 20 million people collectively spend hundreds of millions of hours playing massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). Here the authors investigate whether avatars in one such game, the World of Warcraft (WoW), convey accurate information about their players’ personalities. They assessed consensus and accuracy of avatar-based impressions for 299 WoW players. The authors examined impressions based on avatars alone, and images of avatars presented along with usernames. The personality impressions yielded moderate consensus (avatar-only mean ICC = .32; avatar plus username mean ICC = .66), but no accuracy (avatar only mean r = .03; avatar plus username mean r = .01). A lens-model analysis suggests that observers made use of avatar features when forming impressions, but the features had little validity. Discussion focuses on what factors might explain the pattern of consensus but no accuracy, and on why the results might differ from those based on other virtual domains and virtual worlds.

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/article/personality-impressions-of-world-of-warcraft-players-based-on-their-avatars-and-usernames/125446

To read a PDF sample of this article, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/viewtitlesample.aspx?id=125446

BOOK REVIEW

Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World

Anna Baralt (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA), Albert D. Ritzhaupt (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA)

To obtain a copy of the Book Review, click on the link below.
www.igi-global.com/pdf.aspx?tid=125447&ptid=118613&ctid=17&t=Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World


For full copies of the above articles, check for this issue of the International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations (IJGCMS) in your institution’s library. This journal is also included in the IGI Global aggregated “InfoSci-Journals” database: www.igi-global.com/isj.


CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJGCMS:

The International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations (IJGCMS) publishes research articles, theoretical critiques, and book reviews related to the development and evaluation of games and computer-mediated simulations. One main goal of this peer-reviewed, international journal is to promote a deep conceptual and empirical understanding of the roles of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations across multiple disciplines. A second goal is to help build a significant bridge between research and practice on electronic gaming and simulations, supporting the work of researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.

Indices of IJGCMS:

  • ACM Digital Library
  • Bacon’s Media Directory
  • Cabell’s Directories
  • Compendex (Elsevier Engineering Index)
  • DBLP
  • GetCited
  • Google Scholar
  • INSPEC
  • JournalTOCs
  • MediaFinder
  • PsycINFO®
  • SCOPUS
  • The Standard Periodical Directory
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory

Coverage of IJGCMS:

Recommended topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

 

  • Cognitive, social, and emotional impact of games and simulations
  • Critical reviews and meta-analyses of existing game and simulation literature
  • Current and future trends, technologies, and strategies related to game, simulation development, and implementation
  • Electronic games and simulations in government, business, and the workforce
  • Electronic games and simulations in teaching and learning
  • Frameworks to understand the societal and cultural impacts of games and simulations
  • Impact of game and simulation development use on race and gender game and simulation design
  • Innovative and current research methods and methodologies to study electronic games and simulations
  • Psychological aspects of gaming
  • Teaching of games and simulations at multiple age and grade levelsjustright (1)Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-gaming-computer-mediated/1125

 


oldgamersjpg-620x

The purpose of this special issue is to investigate the use of video games by the elderly, and the representation of elderly adults in video games.

The population of senior citizens is growing: In 2010, there were 40.3 million people aged 65 and above, comprising 13% of the overall population. (This total is 12 times the number it was in 1900, when this group constituted only 4.1% of the population.) By 2050, projections indicate the population over 65 will comprise 20.9% of the population. The findings are based on data from the 2010 Census, as well as the Current Population Survey, the American Community Survey and National Health Interview Survey.

Games to Assist the Elderly

As the elderly begin to experience declines in their physical and sensory capabilities, they will demand—and respond to—products and services that help them maintain their active lifestyles and activities: flexible scheduling, continuing education, travel, intellectual and stimulating experiences, and opportunities for companionship.

 

Games, Interactive Media, and Representation of the Elderly

The representation of the elderly in the media affects the way the elderly perceive themselves, construct their identities, and the relationships they share (Levy, Slade, Kunkel, & Kasl, 2002). Identity and perception of the elderly are influenced through depiction and absence of the elderly in video games. In video games, the elderly are rarely represented, and this absence and inability to play with an elderly avatar venerates youth and may serve to deny aging as a natural part of the life process.

 

Eldertech

Older adults are rapidly becoming the largest market segment in society and will possess the most purchasing power of any demographic in human history, but games and interactive media have been slow to respond to the new demographic realities brought upon by population aging.

 

In this issue we hope to present practitioners and academic perspectives through presenting a broad range of user experience evaluation methods and concepts; application of various user experience evaluation methods; how UX fits into video game development cycle; methods of evaluating user experience during game play and after; and social play.

 

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that

  • Examine Representation of the Elderly in game development
  • The uses of video game technology to enhance quality of life for the elderly.
  • Conduct meta-analyses of existing research on aging and video games
  • Answer specific questions such as:
  • Case studies, worked examples, empirical and phenomenological, application of psychological and humanist approaches?
    • Field research
    • Face to face interviewing
    • Creation of user tests
    • Gathering and organizing statistics
    • Define Audience
    • User scenarios
    • Creating Personas
    • Product design
    • Feature writing
    • Requirement writing
    • Content surveys
    • Graphic Arts
    • Interaction design
    • Information architecture
    • Process flows
    • Usability
    • Prototype development
    • Interface layout and design
    • Wire frames
    • Visual design
    • Taxonomy and terminology creation
    • Copywriting
    • Working with programmers and SMEs
    • Brainstorm and managing scope (requirement) creep
    • Design and UX culture
    • How does game user research examine the elderly and the UI? Should we differentiate pragmatic and hedonic aspects of the game?
    • What are the methodologies for conducting research on the elderly identity, and the uses and design of games for the elderly?

 

 

Potential authors are encouraged to contact Brock R. Dubbels (Dubbels@mcmaster.ca) to ask about the appropriateness of their topic.

 

Deadline for Submission March 2016.

Authors should submit their manuscripts to the submission system using the following link:

http://www.igi-global.com/authorseditors/titlesubmission/newproject.aspx

(Please note authors will need to create a member profile in order to upload a manuscript.)

 

Manuscripts should be submitted in APA format.

 

They will typically be 5000-8000 words in length.

 

Full submission guidelines can be found at: http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx

 

Mission – IJGCMS is a peer-reviewed, international journal devoted to the theoretical and empirical understanding of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations. IJGCMS publishes research articles, theoretical critiques, and book reviews related to the development and evaluation of games and computer-mediated simulations. One main goal of this peer-reviewed, international journal is to promote a deep conceptual and empirical understanding of the roles of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations across multiple disciplines. A second goal is to help build a significant bridge between research and practice on electronic gaming and simulations, supporting the work of researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.

 

avatar_old_wise_man-512

 

 

HammerTownCoderDojo-logo2(1)

Join us at the Terryberry Library for an afternoon of fun and game development.

In the following few sessions we will be learning about Blockly for coding, and then building our own version of Pong, and making our own little AI.

First Step: Create a new account at http://code.org  when you have done so, add the code BYQYAP to be in my section.

Programming Puzzles — 20 minutes

Second Step: Create new account at http://scratch.mit.edu/

Work on our version of Pong

Pong WorkshopWorksheet

creative-children-photography-jason-lee-17

Can UX research take a game that is not fun, and make it more fun?

CFP: UX — What is User Experience in Video Games?

The purpose of this special issue is to investigate the nature of video game UX.

ISO 9241-210[1] defines user experience as “a person’s perceptions and responses that result from the use or anticipated use of a product, system or service”. According to the ISO definition, user experience includes all the users’ emotions, beliefs, preferences, perceptions, physical and psychological responses, behaviors and accomplishments that occur before, during and after use. The ISO also list three factors that influence user experience: system, user and the context of use.

In this issue we hope to present practitioners and academic perspectives through presenting a broad range of user experience evaluation methods and concepts; application of various user experience evaluation methods; how UX fits into video game development cycle; methods of evaluating user experience during game play and after; and social play.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that

  • Present empirical findings on UX in game development
  • Push the theoretical knowledge of UX
  • Conduct meta-analyses of existing research on UX
  • Answer specific questions such as:
  • Case studies, worked examples, empirical and phenomenological, application of psychological and humanist approaches?
    • Field research
    • Universal Access
    • Face to face interviewing
    • Creation of user tests
    • Gathering and organizing statistics
    • Define Audience
    • User scenarios
    • Creating Personas
    • Product design
    • Feature writing
    • Requirement writing
    • Content surveys
    • Graphic Arts
    • Interaction design
    • Information architecture
    • Process flows
    • Usability
    • Prototype development
    • Interface layout and design
    • Wire frames
    • Visual design
    • Taxonomy and terminology creation
    • Copywriting
    • Working with programmers and SMEs
    • Brainstorm and managing scope (requirement) creep
    • Design and UX culture
    • What is the difference between user experience and usability?
    • How does UX research extend beyond examination of the UI? Should we differentiate pragmatic and hedonic aspects of the game?
    • Who is a User Experience researcher, what do they do, and how does one become one?
    • What are the methodologies?

Potential authors are encouraged to contact Brock Dubbels (Dubbels@mcmaster.ca) to ask about the appropriateness of their topic.

Deadline for Submission January 2014.

Authors should submit their manuscripts to the submission system using the following link:

http://www.igi-global.com/authorseditors/titlesubmission/newproject.aspx

(Please note authors will need to create a member profile in order to upload a manuscript.)

Manuscripts should be submitted in APA format.

They will typically be 5000-8000 words in length.

Full submission guidelines can be found at: http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx

Mission – IJGCMS is a peer-reviewed, international journal devoted to the theoretical and empirical understanding of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations. IJGCMS publishes research articles, theoretical critiques, and book reviews related to the development and evaluation of games and computer-mediated simulations. One main goal of this peer-reviewed, international journal is to promote a deep conceptual and empirical understanding of the roles of electronic games and computer-mediated simulations across multiple disciplines. A second goal is to help build a significant bridge between research and practice on electronic gaming and simulations, supporting the work of researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.

 

speakerg2

Gamiceuticals: Video Games for medical diagnosis, treatment,

and professional development

Should games and play be used to diagnose or treat a medical condition? Can video games provide professional development for health professionals? To gather medical data? To provide adherence and behavioral change? Or even become a part of our productivity at work? In this presentation psychological research will be presented to make a case for how games are currently, and potentially, can be used in the eHealth and medical sector.

Join MacGDA for a talk with Brock Dubbels on issues related to games, health, and psychology.

brock brainSign up at http://gme.eventbrite.ca/

Brock Dubbels is an experimental psychologist at the G-Scale Game development and testing laboratory at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. His appointment includes work in the Dept. of Computing and Software (G-Scale) and the McMaster Research Libraries.  Brock specializes in games and software for knowledge and skill acquisition, eHealth, and clinical interventions.

Brock Dubbels has worked since 1999 as a professional in education and instructional design. His specialties include comprehension, problem solving, and game design. From these perspectives he designs face-to-face, virtual, and hybrid learning environments, exploring new technologies for assessment, delivering content, creating engagement with learners, and investigating ways people approach learning. He has worked as a Fulbright Scholar at the Norwegian Institute of Science and Technology; at Xerox PARC and Oracle, and as a research associate at the Center for Cognitive Science at the University of Minnesota. He teaches course work on games and cognition, and how learning research can improve game design for return on investment (ROI). He is also the founder and principal learning architect at www.vgalt.com for design, production, usability assessment and evaluation of learning systems and games.

 

Join the MacMaster Game Development Association: http://macgda.com/

MYCU

 Video Game Design for Children

McMaster Children and Youth University

Presented by: Dr. Brock Dubbels
Togo Salmon Hall, Rm 120, McMaster University

 

Video games can be a lot of fun. But, have you ever stopped to wonder how they are made? Dr. Dubbels will examine the different types of video games and explain how they’re developed and what makes them so entertaining. This event is intended for children 7 to 14 years of age.

Welcome to MCYU

MCYU offers free, monthly Saturday morning lectures for young students (7-14 years old), to spark their curiosity and expose them to the university environment.

 

2 Girls playing video game_GJ31724Our speakers present topics about science, arts, social science and more.

These fun, kid-friendly lectures provide

the opportunity to learn from a real professor,

find out what it feels like to be on campus,

and get a taste of what university life is like!

http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/mcyu/